Nine-Three Streamer

Nine-Three Streamer

This popular Maine pattern was created by Dr. J. Hubert Sanborn of Waterville, Maine. It is a classic smelt imitation named for the first salmon caught on it by the good doctor. It weighed nine pounds, three ounces!
This pattern is often dressed in tandem or traditional feather-wing style but the original pattern called for “three medium green saddle hackles tied on flat”. This gives the fly alot of action in the water indeed, making it a deadly temptation for unsuspecting trout, togue, bass, and landlocked salmon.
Here’s the classic recipe-

Nine-Three Streamer

Hook: 8XL streamer hook, size 8-2
Thread: Black 6/0 (70 denier)
Body: Flat silver tinsel
Wing: Sparse white bucktail extending beyond the bend, over which are three medium green saddle hackles tied on flat, over which are two natural black hackles tied on upright. (the hackles and bucktail should be the same length)
Cheek: Jungle cock

Chief Worumbo

Chief Worumbo

Chief Worumbo (Chief Worumbo of the Sabattus) was a local native American chief of the Abenaki tribe. He was initially known for his friendly negotiations with the first settlers here in my home town of Lisbon, Maine. However, during the Indian uprisings he became an enemy to the whites. It’s said that one night he was fooled by the local settlers, became confused, and his canoe was swept over the falls of the Androscoggin at Little River. He was never seen again.
The great Worumbo Mill, where fine woolens were manufactured for many years, was given his name. The mill is for sale and its future is uncertain. Like the multitudes of salmon that once filled the waters of this great river, it too might fade into lore, becoming only a story of bygone days.